FOREST SCENE WOOD CARVING OF BEAR, DEER, BEAVER, AND BIRDS
FOREST SCENE WOOD CARVING OF BEAR, DEER, BEAVER, AND BIRDS
A SELF-GUIDED TOUR
THE ART OF TIMBERLINE LODGE

Under the Federal Art Project in 1936, many painters and artists in textiles, wood, stone and iron combined their efforts with the builders of Timberline to make this one of America’s first ski lodges. Completed in 1937, our lodge continues to stand proudly at the top of Oregon. It symbolizes the strength of a mountain and embraces all people who visit. Unique to any other lodge in America, Timberline Lodge was hand built during the Depression by hundreds of displaced workers of the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Its story remains to be an inspiration for all.

Art Descriptions
ILLUSTRATION OF TIMBERLINE LODGE EXTERIOR WITH INTERIOR CUTOUT OF HEADHOUSE

Operated by R.L.K. and Company since 1955, our historic landmark lodge is an Oregon icon and stays open every day of the year. Designed in three sections, a central hexagonal fireplace and two wings extending from it, the lodge has three floors for public use. To help set your own curious pace during your visit, this self-guided tour features the spectacular highlights of Wood- Stone- Iron- Textiles- Paintings and Furnishings. Each placard’s QR Scan Code features a digital connection and a helpful map to steer your interests. Please let us share with you our special place. We are proud to be your host. Thanks for your visit.

Reminders: 

  • Please stay out of private guest room hallways, private events, and employee-only areas during your visit.
  • Sorry, no pets allowed. Our general public spaces allow service animals only. We have a limited number of guest rooms that allow dogs with an approved pet policy agreement.

DOWNLOAD ART TOUR MAP or scroll down to view it.
 

FRONT ENTRANCE OF TIMBERLINE IN EARLY WINTER WITH SNOW TUNNEL AND LIGHT DUSTING OF SNOW AND BLUE SKIES
1 / EXTERIOR FRONT OF LODGE

LOCATION: EXTERIOR FRONT OF LODGE
STONE - WOOD - IRON

LEARN MORE ABOUT FRONT ENTRANCE FEATURES AND ARTWORKS

CARVED INDIAN HEAD TIMBERLINE FRONT DOOR
2 / CARVED INDIAN HEAD DOOR

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE GROUND FLOOR
WOOD - IRON

LEARN MORE ABOUT INDIAN HEAD AND IRONWORK

TIMBERLINE MOSAIC TILE FLOOR COMPASS
3 / FLOOR COMPASS

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE FOYER GROUND FLOOR
MOSAIC

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE FLOOR COMPASS MOSAIC

SPRING ON THE MOUNTAIN GLASS MOSAIC BEAR FISHING
4 / SPRING ON THE MOUNTAIN

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE FOYER (LEFT) GROUND FLOOR
GLASS MOSAICS

LEARN MORE ABOUT SPRING ON THE MOUNTAIN MOSAIC

RACHAEL GRIFFIN BRONZE BUST
5 / RACHAEL GRIFFIN HISTORIC EXHIBITION CENTER

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE GROUND FLOOR
WOOD - IRON - TEXTILES - FURNITURE

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE RACHAEL GRIFFIN HISTORIC EXHIBITION CENTER

WOOD RELIEF CARVING OF COVERED WAGON PIONEER SCENE
6 / NEWELL POSTS & COVERED WAGON PIONEER SCENE

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE STAIRWELL (RIGHT) GROUND FLOOR TO MAIN LOBBY
WOOD - IRON

LEARN MORE ABOUT NEWELL POSTS & PIONEER SCENE

TWO KIDS PLAYING PING PONG IN THE BARLOW ROOM
7 / BARLOW ROOM & THE CALENDAR OF MOUNTAIN SPORTS

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE GROUND FLOOR LOBBY (RIGHT HALLWAY)
WOOD - IRON - TEXTILES - LIGHTING FIXTURES

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE BARLOW ROOM

PAUL BUNYAN AND BABE GLASS MOSAIC
8 / BLUE OX BAR & SCENES OF PAUL BUNYAN

LOCATION: BLUE OX BAR GROUND FLOOR
WOOD- IRON- GLASS MOSAICS- STONE

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE BLUE OX BAR

OIL PAINTING OF R.L. KOHNSTAMM ON MT HOOD HOLDING TIMBERLINE MODEL
9 / RICHARD L. KOHNSTAMM

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE GROUND FLOOR LOBBY (LEFT)
PAINTINGS

LEARN MORE ABOUT R.L. KOHNSTAMM

OIL PAINTING CALLED ROAD TO SHANIKO
10 / ROAD TO SHANIKO & ROAD IN EASTERN OREGON

LOCATION: FRONT DESK HALLWAY GROUND FLOOR
PAINTINGS- LIGHT FIXTURES

LEARN MORE ABOUT ROAD TO SHANIKO & ROAD IN EASTERN OREGON

CARVED WOOD NEWELL POST OF EAGLE
11 / MAIN STAIRWAY

LOCATION: FRONT DESK HALLWAY GROUND FLOOR
WOOD- IRON

LEARN MORE ABOUT MAIN STAIRWAY NEWELL POSTS

WATERCOLOR OF TIMBERLINE LODGE
12 / TIMBERLINE LODGE

LOCATION: MEZZANINE FOYER
PAINTINGS

LEARN MORE ABOUT TIMBERLINE LODGE WATERCOLOR

TIMBERLINE MAIN LOBBY FIREPLACE AND GATHERING PLACE
13 / MAIN LOBBY

LOCATION: FIRST FLOOR MAIN LOBBY
WOOD- STONE- IRON- TEXTILES- FURNISHINGS- LIGHT FIXTURES

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE MAIN LOBBY

ABSTRACT OIL PAINTING TITLED THE TEAM FEATURING A PACK OF HORSES
14 / THE TEAM

LOCATION: MAIN LOBBY (West)
PAINTINGS

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE TEAM

CARVED WOOD PANEL OF COUGAR RESTING IN THE FOREST
15 / COUGAR RESTING IN THE FOREST

LOCATION: MAIN LOBBY (South)
WOOD- IRON

LEARN MORE ABOUT COUGAR RESTING IN THE FOREST

OIL PAINTING OF THE MOUNTAIN
16 / THE MOUNTAIN

LOCATION: MAIN LOBBY (East)
PAINTINGS

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE MOUNTAIN PAINTING

WOOD CARVING OF THE FOREST SCENE: BEAR, DEER, BEAVER, BIRDS
17 / FOREST SCENE

LOCATION: CASCADE DINING ROOM- MAIN LOBBY (East)
WOOD- IRON- TEXTILES

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE FOREST SCENE

WOOD MARQUETRY PANEL OF COYOTES
18 / COYOTES

LOCATION: MAIN LOBBY (NORTHEAST)
WOOD

LEARN MORE ABOUT COYOTES

WOOD MARQUETRY PANEL OF MOUNTAIN LIONS
19 / MOUNTAIN LIONS

LOCATION: MAIN LOBBY (NORTHWEST)
WOOD- FURNISHINGS- IRON LIGHT FIXTURES

LEARN MORE ABOUT MOUNTAIN LIONS

OIL PAINTING SYMBOLIZING LODGE BUILDERS: METAL WORK
20 / SYMBOLIZING LODGE BUILDERS: METAL WORK

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (WEST)
WOOD- STONE- PAINTINGS- LIGHT FIXTURES

LEARN MORE ABOUT SYMBOLIZING LODGE BUILDERS: METAL WORK

OIL PAINTING CALLED IN THE GARDEN
21 / IN THE GARDEN

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (SOUTH)
PAINTINGS- STONE- TEXTILES

LEARN MORE ABOUT IN THE GARDEN

OIL PAINTING OF MOUNTAIN LANDSCAPE
22 / MOUNTAIN LANDSCAPE

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (SOUTH)
PAINTINGS

LEARN MORE ABOUT MOUNTAIN LANDSCAPE

OIL PAINTING OF FISH STORY
23 / FISH STORY

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (SOUTH)
PAINTINGS

LEARN MORE ABOUT FISH STORY

OIL PAINTING OF MUSICIANS
24 / MUSICIANS

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (SOUTH)
PAINTINGS

LEARN MORE ABOUT MUSICIANS

OIL PAINTING OF DISHWASHERS
25 / DISHWASHERS

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (SOUTH)
PAINTINGS

LEARN MORE ABOUT DISHWASHERS

OIL PAINTING OF MT. HOOD
26 / MT. HOOD

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (SOUTHEAST ALCOVE)
PAINTINGS- IRON

LEARN MORE ABOUT MT. HOOD PAINTING

RAM'S HEAD BAR
27 / RAM'S HEAD BAR

LOCATION: MEZZANINE EAST
IRON- WOOD- FURNISHINGS

LEARN MORE ABOUT RAM'S HEAD BAR

OIL PAINTING OF MOUNTAIN IN EASTERN OREGON
28 / MOUNTAIN IN EASTERN OREGON

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (NORTHWEST ALCOVE)
PAINTINGS

LEARN MORE ABOUT MOUNTAIN IN EASTERN OREGON

ABSTRACT OIL PAINTING OF THE SKIER
29 / THE SKIER

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (NORTH)
PAINTINGS

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE SKIER

OIL PAINTING OF WOODCUTTERS
30 / WOODCUTTERS

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (NORTH)
PAINTINGS- STONE- TEXTILES

LEARN MORE ABOUT WOODCUTTERS

PAINTING OF SYMBOLIZING LODGE BUILDERS: WOOD WORK
31 / SYMBOLIZING LODGE BUILDERS: WOOD WORK

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (WEST)
PAINTINGS

LEARN MORE ABOUT SYMBOLIZING LODGE BUILDERS: WOOD WORK

Art Tour Map

1 / EXTERIOR FRONT OF LODGE

LOCATION: EXTERIOR FRONT OF BUILDING
STONE- WOOD- IRON

Our winter season features a lit tunnel entrance to keep snow from blocking the front entrance. A stone staircase leads you into the mountain-inspired 55k square foot working ski lodge. The lodge’s south-facing front exterior features a carved thunderbird and two rams’ heads. More wildlife design elements are found under the eaves, including bear and buffalo heads. Notice the wooden shingles, large board-and-batten siding and the steeply pitched roof. Above the roofline, the central stone chimney rises from the peak of the head house and is punctuated by arched vents. A 750-pound brass and bronze weather vane at the roof apex is almost 8-feet wide and 29 1/2 – feet tall. It’s a modification of the Wild Goose Moon symbol from the Camp Fire Girls Handbook.

Circular and rectangular window grilles are on either side of the front door. Made of wrought iron, these window grilles are of chevron and arrow design forms. During the summer, you will see flags waving above the front entrance toward the southern line of the cascade mountain range that reaches to Mexico.

  • An ADA accessible elevator entrance is located at the east side of the building. Follow the front parking row to the right where another door leads you to an elevator. Follow the signs along the ramped floor to the lower lobby.
  • Winter Tunnel, rhiza A+D, 2009
  • Exterior wood carving Thunderbird and Native Motifs designs by Howard Gifford, 1937
  • Exterior bear and buffalo head wood carving by US Forest service employee, 1960
  • Weather vane, brass and bronze, by WPA blacksmiths, 1936-37
  • Iron window grilles by WPA blacksmiths, 1937-38.
  • Summer flags- Cascadia, Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Community of Oregon, State of Oregon, United States of America, US Forest Service, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs

2 / CARVED INDIAN HEAD DOOR

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE GROUND FLOOR
WOOD- IRON

If you look at the base of this door’s powerful Indian head carving by Jim Duncan, you will see the initials of some US Forest Service employees who worked on building Timberline Lodge. More of the native-style artwork themes of the Art Deco Movement are displayed throughout the lodge, such as the iron handles with the arrow-bent design on the entrance’s double doors. Just inside, look up to find painted rams’ heads.

Wood carving, Indian Head Door, by Jim Duncan, 1937 (The initials, left to right, are: JF- James Frankland, regional engineer; WIT- W.I. Turner, architect; HG- Howard Gifford, architect; DW- Dean Wright, architect; EDC- Ethel Daniel Chatfield, secretary; LF- Linn Forest, architect)

Iron door handles and hardware by WPA blacksmith shop workers, 1936-37

3 / FLOOR COMPASS

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE FOYER GROUND FLOOR
MARBLE MOSAIC

Inside the front entrance, the helpful floor compass by Pete Ferrarin, is a marble mosaic of brass and tile in cement. His son, Mario, restored it in 1979 after thousands of ski boots over time had damaged it beyond repair. During a 1983 remodel, rust tiles were added to highlight the lodge’s natural earth setting. Our lodge has curved lobby layouts that feature hand-adzed beams and columns of timber harvested from this site. Masoned stone, hand-forged iron and enormous wood planks secure a wonderful visual pace for your visit.

Mosaic tile floor, Peter Ferrarin, 1936-37

SPRING ON THE MOUNTAIN

4 / SPRING ON THE MOUNTAIN

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE FOYER (LEFT) GROUND FLOOR
GLASS MOSAICS

Mosaic artists Pete Ferrarin and Charles Haller applied glass tiles and other recycled hard materials to create a mountain wildlife and floral scene for the drinking fountain at entrance’s left wall. Designed by Virginia Darce and Tom Laman, the wall depicts regional animals and plants such as the black bear with salmon, white-tailed deer, wild turkey, striped skunk, fir tree, rhododendron, trillium and skunk cabbage.

Glass tile and hard materials mosaic wall, Spring on the Mountain, by Virginia Darce, Tom Laman, Peter Ferrarin and Charles Haller, 1938-40.

5 / RACHAEL GRIFFIN HISTORIC EXHIBITION CENTER

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE GROUND FLOOR LOBBY (STRAIGHT)
STONE- WOOD- IRON- TEXTILES- FURNITURE

The lodge’s centered hexagonal stone chimney welcomes you straight ahead from the front entrance with a wooden location sign. Carved with Timberline’s iconic font, this sign will help guide you to all outlets of the lodge.

Mountain-inspired curved arches, known as the “Timberline Arch,” feature the Cascadian architecture style of the lodge that embraces volcanic stone with dense wood beams, brackets and wrought-iron straps. Emphasizing the pioneer wagon wheel, sturdy spoke-like beams of fir and pine extend the solid ceiling structure above. Using large cut stone, 8-10 mason workers built the enormous fireplace. 800,000 pounds of andesite stone reaches a total of 92 feet and was built within a wood frame during the winter of 1936-37. Rawhide seats around the fireplace were originally designed to be used by skiers in wet ski gear

Curator of the Portland Art Museum, Rachael Griffin (1906-83) developed the concept of this lower lobby that was once the main ski lounge. It now features examples of wrought-iron works on a panel and floor area. Ironworks can be found everywhere throughout the lodge. During construction, the WPA blacksmiths would make all of the ironworks in a Portland shop with forge, anvil and hand-held tools. Requiring almost no casting, no pneumatic hammer or acetylene torch, the pieces were strictly handwork done mostly on the raw ingots. The spiral andirons of each fireplace, as well as the boot scrapers, are recycled railroad rails. After completion of lodge construction, the snow chains from the trucks were turned into fireplace screens still used today in the Lower Lobby and Main Lobby.

The carved Indian-inspired designs in the lintels around the lobby were taken from “The Year in Moons” of the Camp Fire Girls handbook. Follow the back wall of the exhibition center for more displays. A replica of a fireplace guest room features vintage skis, clothing, oil paintings and the original chair made for President Franklin D Roosevelt used during his 1937 dedication event. Griffin is portrayed in a bronze casting display made by Portland sculptor, Manuel Izquierdo.

The back right corner of the exhibition center highlights a timeline. The corner’s hidden nook, called “The Coyote Den,” is a quaint sitting area with more arch-shaped wood chairs, vintage photographs, wrought-iron works, books and photographs. The original landscape plan is displayed here, too. Typically, the video, The Builders of Timberline, is showing in The Coyote Den.

Civilian Conservation Corps (C.C.C.) uniforms and blankets were recycled, hooked and handwoven into rugs and wall hangings for the lodge. Some are displayed in cases here along the ground floor hallways. A display loom with cloth scraps sit next to the US Forest Service (USFS) desk. Here, you can look at a Mt Hood topographic map and use your smartphone to scan area trailhead information that are posted on the adjacent easel during the summer months. The Timberline Ski Area trail map is on display at the easel yearlong.

Wrought iron hardware, spiral andirons, door latches, furniture frames and boot scrapers by WPA blacksmith shop workers.

Bronze casting, Rachael Griffin, by Manuel Izquierdo

Oil painting, Untitled (Human Figures), by Howard S. Sewall, 1938.

Oil painting, Untitled (Sawmill), by Erich Lamade, 1933.

Watercolor painting, Landscape Plan for Timberline, by Emmet Blanchfield, 1937

Hooked rugs—Wagon Wheel, Wave, Zigzag, by WPA textile artists, 1937-38.

COVERED WAGON PIONEER SCENE

6 / NEWEL POSTS & COVERED WAGON PIONEER SCENE

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE STAIRWELL (RIGHT) GROUND FLOOR TO MAIN LOBBY
WOOD- IRON

To the direct right of front entrance, a set of stairs lead you to one of several ways to the Main Lobby. Recycled telephone poles from Portland enabled wood carvers to create newel posts for many of the stairways of the lodge. Here, a carved fawn leads you up to a wooded Oregon Pioneer scene, “Covered Wagon.” This three-piece relief carving by Valentine Weise and Melvin Keegan was inspired by Keegan’s great-grandmother’s pioneer stories. This stairwell also features newel posts of a carved bear and pelican. Decorated ends of the twisted hand-forged iron rails are pinecones.

At the top foyer of the stairs stands a great 1833-pound front door decorated with wrought-iron hardware and a deer head knocker. This door remains open during the summer months where you can see the south-facing Cascade volcano mountain range, particularly Mt Jefferson, Broken Top and the Three Sisters. President Roosevelt dedicated the historic lodge from the Observation Deck on September 28, 1937. Iron tables and chairs are set during summer months for you to enjoy the view with a beverage or snack. Side stone stairs lead you back down to the lodge parking lot.

More free-standing wrought-iron pedestals rest here on the floor across from an iron display case of the carefully hand forged iron hardware, signage and decor pieces.

Carved wooden Newel Posts of Fawn, Eagle and Pelican by WPA carvers, 1936-37

Newel post plaster molds created by Florence Thomas, 1936-37

Wood relief carving, Covered Wagon, by Valentine Weise and Melvin Keegan, 1936-37

Hand forged iron handrails by Daryl Nelson and Russell Maugans, 1989

BARLOW ROOM

7 / BARLOW ROOM AND THE CALENDAR OF MOUNTAIN SPORTS

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE GROUND FLOOR LOBBY (RIGHT HALLWAY)
WOOD- IRON- TEXTILES- LIGHTING FIXTURES

The right hallway from the front entrance leads you to the Barlow Room, a popular family game, meeting space and comfort spot that was once the Ski Grille food cafeteria. Wooden carved gates with large native-inspired decor curtains open toward some stairs and down to the room’s several linoleum wall mural panels. Hinges, hardware, plates and handles of these doors were made by Dave Thompson.

Note: An ADA accessible elevator entrance is located at the back left corner of the room. Follow the lower lobby hallway, turn right and proceed along the stone hallway. The ADA entrance is to the right.

“The Calendar of Mountain Sports,” linoleum wall murals were carved and painted by Douglas Lynch. Regional forester, Thomas Sherrard, as well as Lynch’s wife, Alexandra, his art instructor and other friends served as models for the mural. Lynch also painted two folkloric murals for the arched walls at the back of the room.

Wood carvings, such as a canoe light fixture and some crossed-ski wall decorations, a ping-pong table and shuffleboard game give the room a playful mood. Above the shuffleboard game, RLK and Company’s founder, Richard L Kohnstamm, shines in a photograph with his son, friends and ski instructor, Pepi Gabl.

Wall murals- oil and shellac on carved linoleum, The Calendar of Mountain Sports, by David Lynch, 1937. (South Wall - Fly Fishing, Spring Walk, Angler & Fly Box; West Wall - Packhorses, Family Camping, Camping & Wildflowers, Cabin & Cooking; North Wall -  Dinner Table, Dancers, Toboggan, Photographer; East Wall - Winter.)

Door Iron works by Dave Thompson, 1986

FLY FISHING - SOUTH WALL
SPRING WALK - SOUTH WALL
ANGLER & FLY BOX - SOUTH WALL
PACKHORSES - WEST WALL
FAMILY CAMPING - WEST WALL
CAMPING & WILDFLOWERS - WEST WALL
CABIN & COOKING - WEST WALL
DINNER TABLE - NORTH WALL
DANCERS - NORTH WALL
TOBOGGAN - NORTH WALL
PHOTOGRAPHER - NORTH WALL
WINTER - EAST WALL
PAUL BUNYAN AND BABE THE BLUE OX

8 / BLUE OX BAR & SCENES OF PAUL BUNYAN

LOCATION: BLUE OX BAR GROUND FLOOR
WOOD- IRON- GLASS MOSAICS- STONE

Past the Barlow Room, take a right at the end of the hallway past the vintage ski collection and wheel-barrow bench. A quick left down a few steps leads you to the tiny Blue Ox Bar. Inside the cozy bar are three glass mosaic murals of Paul Bunyan, a Midwestern logger whose folklore imagery reached all the way to the Pacific Northwest and Timberline Lodge. Virginia Darce, Charles Haller and assistant, Peter Ferrarin, completed the three scenes within two years. Left mural introduces Bunyan and Babe. “The winter of the blue snow he found Babe, the blue ox, in the water, in a river, almost drowned.”— Darce, 1979.

The gate door entrance and hand rails feature more native-detailed hand forged iron works. All furniture chairs are emphasizing the mountain arch, which you will find throughout the lodge. An afterthought, the Blue Ox Bar was originally intended to be a wood storage room. The extended stone-walled hallway to the right was the original exterior of the lodge where you can see the windows of the adjacent Barlow Room. This hallway leads to the elevator for the lower accessible ADA entrance, as well as to the accessible ADA entrance to the Barlow Room.

Ski and climbing clothing and equipment are displayed outside the Blue Ox and the back Barlow Room door, which is the Tenth Mountain Division artifact display.

Glass mosaic wall murals, Paul Bunyan Carrying Babe the Blue Ox in the Winter of the Blue Snow, Paul Bunyan with Folded Arms and Paul Bunyan with his Blue Ox by Virginia Darce, Charles Haller and Peter Ferrarin, 1939.

Iron handrails at steps by Russell Maugans and Daryl Nelson, 1986.

Iron gate, Russell Maugans, 1990.

Wooden chairs, tables and bench designed by Howard Gifford, US Forest Service architect, 1937

RICHARD L. KOHNSTAMM

9 / RICHARD L. KOHNSTAMM

LOCATION: FRONT ENTRANCE GROUND FLOOR LOBBY (LEFT)
PAINTINGS

Navigate your way back to the ground floor’s curved front entrance lobby. Left of the entrance, on the way to the front registration desk, stands an oil painting portrait of Richard L. Kohnstamm (1926-2006). Since 1955, the Kohnstamm family business, RLK and Company, has operated the lodge and ski area under a special-use permit with the US Forest Service. Commissioned to painter Henk Pander in 2005, the portrait was unveiled to honor the 50-year anniversary of Kohnstamm’s operations and his tremendous dedication to preserve this national iconic lodge and innovative ski area. A tract of land above the Palmer Snowfield was designated the Richard L. Kohnstamm Wilderness Area in March 2009.

Oil painting, Richard L. Kohnstamm by Henk Pander, 2005

ROAD TO SHANIKO

10 / ROAD TO SHANIKO & ROAD IN EASTERN OREGON

LOCATION: FRONT DESK HALLWAY GROUND FLOOR
PAINTINGS- LIGHT FIXTURES

The left hallway from the front entrance also leads you past the front desk registration area. Notice the above ox yoke light fixture at the desk and further down the hallway at the gift shop, which details the pioneer theme. Behind the desk, an office doorway resembles the “Timberline Arch” mountain-inspired Cascadian architecture. Somedays, you can find Timberline’s St. Bernard mascot, Heidi, relaxing behind the front desk. Although she and brother, Bruno, don’t live on-site, they certainly carry the tradition of making our guests feel at home.

High along the left hallway wall (across the elevator) you will see oil paintings Road to Shaniko and Road in Eastern Oregon by Charles Heaney. More of Heaney’s work can be seen in the lodge’s Main Lobby and Mezzanine.

Oil paintings, Road to Shaniko and Road in Eastern Oregon by Henk Pander, 2005.

Ox yoke light fixture by WPA wood workers, 1936-37

11 / MAIN STAIRWAY TO MAIN LOBBY

LOCATION: FRONT DESK HALLWAY GROUND FLOOR
WOOD- IRON

Across the front registration desk, another staircase (or the adjacent elevator) takes you up to the heart of the lodge, the Main Lobby. More recycled cedar utility poles, called newel posts, of the main stairway highlight animals and birds of the region. The wrought iron handrails were created with hand held tools without welding, bolts or rivets. To the left, at the top of the first flight of stairs, is the Main Lobby.

Note: An accessible ADA accessible elevator is available from the Ground Floor Lobby to the Main Lobby, located to the left of the main stairway.

Carved wooden Newel Posts of Beaver, Black Bear, Fox, Lynx, Mallard with Broken Wing, Owl and Western Kingfisher by WPA carvers, 1936-37

Newel post plaster molds created by Florence Thomas, 1936-37

Iron handrails by WPA blacksmiths 1937

12 / TIMBERLINE LODGE

LOCATION: MEZZANINE FOYER
PAINTINGS

A small watercolor, Timberline Lodge, by Howard Sewall hangs on the main lobby floor near the stairwell by the elevator.

Watercolor painting, Timberline Lodge, by Howard S Sewall, 1938

13 / MAIN LOBBY

LOCATION: FIRST FLOOR MAIN LOBBY
WOOD- STONE- IRON- TEXTILES- FURNISHINGS- LIGHT FIXTURES

This six-sided Main Lobby (a.k.a. Head House) rises 55 feet and emphasizes the harmony of wood, iron, stone and handcrafted furnishings. At its center, a hexagonal Andesite stone chimney features three fireplaces. It was built around an internal frame to keep it straight while mason workers used scaffolding to reach the ceiling. Stones were all collected from this site location and hand chiseled.

Emphasizing the pioneer wagon wheel, sturdy spoke-like beams of fir and pine extend the solid ceiling structure above. White oak floors embrace the daylight and set a comfy tone at night. Tall standing wrought-iron floor lamps and the iron ceiling chandeliers accent parchment shades. Original shades were rawhide.

The impactful Cascade architecture showcases more mountain-inspired curved arches. Trucked in from Washington State’s Gifford Pinchot National forest are six great Ponderosa Pine columns. Henry Steiner hand hewed these columns into hexagonal shapes from the raw timbers with hand tools, a broadax and foot adze. Furnishings are either the original frames or re-creations in original styles, such as the hexagonal wood-iron couches, hexagonal wood tables, wood lobby chairs, desks and tables. Replaced upholstery and drapery fabrics continue to be woven in patterns and colors in the spirit of the originals.

Start counter-clockwise to the South to see original paintings, carved wood murals and access to the summertime Observation Deck. Keep following the hexagon flow past the Cascade Dining Room, access to the C.S. Price Wing and outdoor patio.

Carved wooden Newel Posts of Beaver, Black Bear, Fox, Lynx, Mallard with Broken Wing, Owl and Western Kingfisher by WPA carvers, 1936-37

Plaster molds created by Florence Thomas, 1936-37

Iron handrails by WPA blacksmiths 1937

Couches, chairs, tables, desks by WPA wood workers 1937, some are replicated by local wood workers 1980s

Chandeliers and floor lamps in Main Lobby by WPA blacksmiths, 1937

THE TEAM

14 / THE TEAM

LOCATION: MAIN LOBBY (West)
PAINTINGS

From the main stairway (or elevator), enter the Main Lobby and follow the hexagonal flow of direction to your right (counter-clockwise). Clayton (C.S.) Price was one of the first fine artists to be assigned projects for Timberline Lodge. The Team is a smaller easel painting that hangs above the West Head House’s wall seats. Described as one of the West’s first Modernist painters, Price’s style had become strongly expressive with blocky structural forms.

Oil painting, The Team, by Clayton (C.S.) Price, 1937

COUGAR RESTING IN THE FOREST

15 / COUGAR RESTING IN FOREST

LOCATION: MAIN LOBBY (South)
WOOD- IRON

Continue counter-clockwise in the Main Lobby from the main stairway and look above the southern archway to see the smooth low relief wood carved panel, Cougar Resting in Forest, by Florence Thomas (If you’ve entered the Main Lobby from the front entrance stairway or from the front Observation Deck’s vestibule entrance, look above the archway as you enter). She also made drawings for light fixtures and wood sculptures of the lodge. Thomas created the plaster models of animals and birds that were carved into the stairway newel posts by WPA wood carvers.

Across the archway attached to the stone hexagonal fireplace is Timberline’s metal information sign, made by Henry Harth, which includes elevation, distant and snow level information.

Carved wood panel, Cougar Resting in Forest by Florence Thomas, 1937

Iron signage, Timberline Information Sign, by Henry Harth, 1938

THE MOUNTAIN

16 / THE MOUNTAIN

LOCATION: MAIN LOBBY (East)
PAINTINGS

The oil painting, The Mountain, by Charles Heaney hangs to the right of the Cascade Dining Room at the Main Lobby’s East Head House. While the lodge was under construction, Interior designer Margery Hoffman Smith took Heaney to visit the lodge during the summer so he could get a feel for the setting. Considered one of his most significant works, The Mountain, is the first of four oil paintings Heaney created for Timberline Lodge. Many critics applauded his decision to omit the mountain’s top in this particular piece.

Oil painting, The Mountain, by Charles Heaney, 1937

FOREST SCENE

17 / FOREST SCENE

LOCATION: CASCADE DINING ROOM- MAIN LOBBY (East)
WOOD- IRON- TEXTILES

At the far end of the room above the stone fireplace in the Cascade Dining Room, is a relief carving Forest Scene by Portland artist, Erich Lamade. This low-relief carving is embraced by the surrounding dining room’s tables and arched-back wooden chairs made from local Douglas fir trees. Notice the arch backs of the dining chairs, resembling the signature Cascade architecture theme. Some cylindrical light fixtures resembling Indian drums are painted burnt red and yellow ochre in a zigzag fashion and are suspended from the Cascade Dining room’s ceiling by an iron rod.

The sub-floor entrance settles the eye past the entrance’s two distinctive coyote head ornamental wrought-iron gates made by blacksmith O.B. Dawson. Other elements of the gates include vertical and horizontal panels of zigzags, semi-circles and stair steps. The bolt is a rattlesnake shape. Fourteen handwoven draperies inside the dining room are true to the spirit of the originals of the 1930s and feature the era’s bright colors and horizontal stripes.

Carved wood panel, Forest Scene, by Erich Lamade, 1938

Wrought iron gates, Coyote Head Gates, by O.B. Dawson, WPA master blacksmith, 1937

Re-created woven drapes by Comprehensive Educational Training Act (CETA) textile workshop artists, 1975-79

COYOTES

18 / COYOTES

LOCATION: MAIN LOBBY (Northeast)
WOOD

At the northeast foyer of the Main Lobby above the exit patio door, Aimee Spencer Gorham’s wood marquetry, Coyotes, beautifully soaks into the lodge’s wooden walls. Her marquetry art process involved significant techniques of precisely cut wood pieces being glued to a wood panel. Next, the panel was put into a press and left for 24-hours under five tons of pressure. After an extended time sanding and scraping, over 20 coats of wax were applied using a special white wax formula.

Wood marquetry panel, Coyotes, by Aimee Spencer Gorham, 1938

MOUNTAIN LIONS

19 / MOUNTAIN LIONS

LOCATION: MAIN LOBBY (Northwest)
WOOD- FURNISHINGS- IRON LIGHT FIXTURES

A second wood marquetry panel from Aimee Spencer Gorham, Mountain Lions, displays above the exit patio door of the Main Lobby’s northwest foyer. Oregon white oak game tables and knotty pine desk chairs located at the foyer are original pieces and serve as the perfect spot to write, read, play and gaze. Margery Hoffman Smith, WPA interior designer, was inspired by water bugs (a.k.a. water skippers) she saw as a child on Oregon’s McKenzie River. The result from this inspiration are three wrought iron ceiling light chandeliers located along the curved lobby ceilings, each with eight legs leading to ceiling fastenings. Original diffusers were replaced with acrylic ones in the 1970s.

Wood marquetry panel, Mountain Lions, by Aimee Spencer Gorham, 1938

Desks, tables and chairs by WPA woodworkers, 1937-38

Iron ceiling light fixtures, Water bug chandeliers, 1937, by WPA blacksmiths.

SYMBOLIZING LODGE BUILDERS: METAL WORK

20 / SYMBOLIZING LODGE BUILDERS: METAL WORK

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (West)
WOOD- STONE- PAINTINGS- LIGHT FIXTURES

Take the stairs (or main elevator) up one floor to the Mezzanine, home of the Ram’s Head Bar and Restaurant. (Please ask the Host for access around the Mezzanine during Ram’s Head business hours)

As you enter the Mezzanine, look closer at the massive Douglas fir wood table made by WPA woodworkers. The bottom table supports are ram’s heads and were carved by Melvin Keegan. This open balcony-style view begins almost eye-level to one of the large hexagonal ceiling light fixtures. More of the andesite stone chimney’s charm is revealed, such as a petroglyph design of a figure holding a staff and standing next to an elaborate X-pattern. Chipped into the surface of the stone, this is one of three figures that were most likely done when the scaffolding for constructing the chimney was still in place. The Mezzanine is a terrific balcony gallery that features the Art Deco era’s paintings from the Federal Art Project FAP.

Throughout the country, and in fact the world, in the 1930s labor and workers were favored themes especially for public art. Though the times were tough, it was also a stimulating period for artists, whose work was valued, sought and used by the federal government post-Depression era, particularly the FAP. The Mezzanine’s display of oil paintings are the direct result of Burt Brown Barker, FAP director, Joseph Danysh, FAP regional director and Margery Hoffman Smith, assistant art director, working together with Emerson J. Griffith, director Oregon WPA.

Howard Sewall’s paintings pay homage to the crafters and builders of Timberline Lodge. Following counter-clockwise, Sewall’s Symbolizing Lodge Builders: Metal Work is displayed across the host stand.

Ram’s Head table, top by WPA woodworkers; carved table supports by Melvin Keegan, 1937-38.

Oil painting, Symbolizing Lodge Builders: Metal Work, by Howard S. Sewall, 1937.

IN THE GARDEN

21 / IN THE GARDEN

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (South)
PAINTINGS- STONE- TEXTILES

Howard Sewall’s In the Garden was added to Timberline lodge in 1980, when it was donated by the Metropolitan Arts Commission, Portland.

An alcove of more durable wood tables and arched-back dining chairs gives Ram’s Head dining guests a gorgeous southern Oregon valley view of the Cascade Range during their meal. Mt Jefferson, Broken Top and the Three Sisters are more mountain neighbors that stand as a connective spine of volcanoes, known as the “Ring of Fire.” Handwoven draperies inside the dining alcove are true to the spirit of the originals of the 1930s and feature the era’s bright colors and horizontal stripes.

As you follow counter-clockwise toward the bar, look over the balcony at the side of the chimney for a flying bird over three triangles (mountain peaks) petroglyph design.

Oil painting, In the Garden, by Howard S. Sewall, 1938

Stone chimney ornament, Humming Bird, by WPA stone workers.

MOUNTAIN LANDSCAPE

22 / MOUNTAIN LANDSCAPE

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (South)
PAINTINGS

Above more dining tables, another small easel oil painting by C.S. Price, Mountain Landscape, is displayed just past the southern large dining alcove as you make your way to the Ram’s Head Bar. Price was raised on a cattle farm, proved up a ranch of his own as a young adult, became an illustrator, moved to Oregon and devoted the rest of his life as a painter.

Oil painting, Mountain Landscape, by C.S. Price, 1938

FISH STORY

23 / FISH STORY

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (South)
PAINTINGS

Darrell Austin painted several works for the lodge, including four light-hearted depictions of youth at work and play in a setting which could be the lodge. Austin met with the architects and designers in 1936 before lodge construction began. The first, Fish Story, is located just after the southern large dining alcove.

Oil painting, Fish Story, by Darrell Austin, 1936

MUSICIANS

24 / MUSICIANS

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (South)
PAINTINGS

Oil painting, Musicians, by Darrell Austin, 1936

DISHWASHERS

25 / DISHWASHERS

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (South)
PAINTINGS

Oil painting, Dishwashers, by Darrell Austin, 1936

MT. HOOD

26 / MT. HOOD

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (Southeast Alcove)
PAINTINGS- IRON

Tucked in the small and cozy southeast alcove next to the Ram’s Head Bar is an oil painting, Mt Hood, by William Givler. It was commissioned for the 25th anniversary of the lodge. Here the snowy mountain is surrounded by other mountains and foothills with what we sense as the wind, snow, mist and rain.

Oil painting, Mt Hood, by William Givler, 1963

RAM'S HEAD BAR

27 / RAM’S HEAD BAR

LOCATION: MEZZANINE EAST
IRON- WOOD- FURNISHINGS

In 1950, the Forest Service allowed lodge management to create the Ram’s Head Bar in the Mezzanine. By 1953, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) issued a license for lodge management to sell liquor by the drink. Until then, the lodge operated under a “bottle” permit whereby guests could bring their own alcoholic beverages. Although gambling was not prohibited by the Forest Service, “amusement machines” were installed, including slot machines. This was a short-lived scenario as numerous short-fallings of gambling, scandal and chaos resulted in the entire lodge shutting down for a few months until new operator, Richard L Kohnstamm was awarded concession permit in April 1955.

Furnishings, such as the lounge loveseats, have original frames, with replaced upholstery matching the original color themes of the 1930s. Their long coffee tables are originals, as well as the bar area’s wait tables now used as host stands. Two carved Ram’s heads at each side of the bar highlight the extended view from windows to the east’s White River Canyon. The bar’s decorative wrought-iron gate locks during non-business hours.

Couches, chairs, tables, desks by WPA wood workers 1937, some are replicated by local wood workers 1980s

Iron gate by WPA blacksmiths 1937

MOUNTAIN IN EASTERN OREGON

28 / MOUNTAIN IN EASTERN OREGON

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (Northwest Alcove)
PAINTINGS

Another oil painting by Charles Heaney hangs in the small northeast alcove just past the Ram’s Head Bar.

Oil painting, Mountain in Eastern Oregon, by Charles Heaney, 1950s

THE SKIER

29 / THE SKIER

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (North)
PAINTINGS

The Skier, by Darrell Austin is displayed on the north wall just before the great picture windows of the Ram’s Head dining area.

Oil painting, The Skier, by Darrell Austin, 1936.

WOODCUTTERS

30 / WOODCUTTERS

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (North)
PAINTINGS- STONE- TEXTILES

The fourth and final oil painting of the series by Darrell Austin, Woodcutters. Be sure to look over the balcony at eye-level for another petroglyph chipped into the chimney. This one reveals a circular wheel with four cogs known as a collection of arms and hands that represent the community of artists and builders who created the lodge.

Another dining alcove in this north side of the Mezzanine gifts you an inspiring view of the mountain and the Palmer snowfield. Handwoven draperies inside the dining alcove are true to the spirit of the originals of the 1930s and feature the era’s bright colors and horizontal stripes. All are from restoration projects of 1975 to current. Look again at the chimney for another ornament, “Medicine Man with a pipe and Thunderbird.”

Oil painting, Woodcutters, by Darrell Austin, 1936

Stone chimney ornament, Working Hands, by WPA stone workers.

Stone chimney ornament, Medicine Man with a Pipe and Thunderbird, by WPA stone workers.

SYMBOLIZING LODGE BUILDERS: WOOD WORK

31 / SYMBOLIZING LODGE BUILDERS: WOOD WORK

LOCATION: MEZZANINE (West)
PAINTINGS

Symbolizing Lodge Builders: Wood Work, the second large mural by Howard Sewall, features the neutral silvery-green tones and geometric shapes the Art Deco Movement.

Oil painting, Symbolizing Lodge Builders: Wood Work, by Howard S. Sewall, 1937

 

You’ve reached the finale of the Self-Guided Tour for the general public’s full and/or partial access of the historic lodge.

Please continue down the stairs or allotted elevators to return to the front exit. Across the upper parking lot, you can enter the Wy’East Day Lodge to see more wonderful art in the areas of Tapestry, Fiber Art, Wood Carvings, Glass Cast Murals and Sculptures.

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